HOW IELTS IS SCORED  | MRK IELTS

HOW IELTS IS SCORED | MRK IELTS

IELTS results are reported on a 9-band scale 

IELTS results are designed to be simple and easy to understand. Results are reported as band scores on a scale from 1 (the lowest) to 9 (the highest). The IELTS band scale has remained consistent and has acquired currency around the world over the past three decades.

Band score: 9
Skill level: Expert user
Description:
The test taker has fully operational command of the language. Their use of English is appropriate, accurate and fluent, and shows complete understanding.

Band score: 8
Skill level: Very good user
Description:
The test taker has fully operational command of the language with only occasional unsystematic inaccuracies and inappropriate usage. They may misunderstand some things in unfamiliar situations. They handle complex and detailed argumentation well.

Band score: 7
Skill level: Good user
Description:
The test taker has operational command of the language, though with occasional inaccuracies, inappropriate usage and misunderstandings in some situations. They generally handle complex language well and understand detailed reasoning.

Band score: 6
Skill level: Competent user
Description:
The test taker has an effective command of the language despite some inaccuracies, inappropriate usage and misunderstandings. They can use and understand fairly complex language, particularly in familiar situations.

Band score: 5
Skill level: Modest user
Description:
The test taker has a partial command of the language and copes with overall meaning in most situations, although they are likely to make many mistakes. They should be able to handle basic communication in their own field.

Band score: 4
Skill level: Limited user
Description:
The test taker’s basic competence is limited to familiar situations. They frequently show problems in understanding and expression. They are not able to use complex language.

Band score: 3
Skill level: Extremely limited user
Description:
The test taker conveys and understands only general meaning in very familiar situations. There are frequent breakdowns in communication.

Band score: 2
Skill level: Intermittent user
Description:
The test taker has great difficulty understanding spoken and written English.

Band score: 1
Skill level: Non-user
Description:
The test taker has no ability to use the language except a few isolated words.

Band score: 0
Skill level: Did not attempt the test
Description:
The test taker did not answer the questions.

IELTS Speaking: Test Day Advice

IELTS Speaking: Test Day Advice

Speaking test advice

Follow this Speaking test advice and try to talk fluently.

The Speaking test is a face-to-face conversation with a certified examiner. It is as close to a real-life situation as a test can get.

The examiner will ask you about familiar topics such as home, work or studies in part 1. This should help you feel comfortable when speaking. Try and relax so that you can speak as naturally as possible.

Take time before the test to practise speaking with a partner, friend or teacher.

Make the most of your IELTS Speaking test:

  • try to talk as much as you can
  • talk as fluently as possible and be spontaneous
  • relax, be confident and enjoy using your English
  • develop your answers
  • speak more than the examiner
  • ask for clarification if necessary
  • do not learn prepared answers; the examiner is trained to spot this and will change the question
  • express your opinions; you will be assessed on your ability to communicate
  • the examiner’s questions tend to be fairly predictable; practise at home and record yourself
IELTS Reading: Test Day Advice

IELTS Reading: Test Day Advice

Reading test advice

Follow this Reading test advice, and make sure you understand how to respond to ‘completion’ type questions.

It is essential that you write your answers on the answer sheet. Nothing you write on the question paper will be marked.

You may write your answers on the question paper and transfer them to the answer sheet before the end of the test if you like. However, it is important to note that you will not be given extra time to do this.

You must write your answers in pencil 

Make the most of your IELTS Reading test:

  • look out for the title, headings and any special features such as capital letters, underlining, italics, figures, graphs and tables
  • make sure that you understand the questions and follow instructions carefully
  • pay attention to timing; do not spend too long on one passage or question
  • do not try and read every word; remember, you are reading for a purpose
  • if you do not know the answer to a question, attempt it but do not waste time; move quickly onto the next one
  • do not panic if you do not know anything about the subject of the text; all the answers can be found in the text
  • the word(s) you use must be taken from the Reading text; you must not change the form of the word(s) in the text
  • do not worry if there is a word that you do not understand – you may not need to use it
  • check your spelling
  • be careful to use singular and plural correctly
  • focus precisely on what you are asked to do in ‘completion’ type questions
  • if the question asks you to complete the note ‘in the…’ and the correct answer is ‘evening’, just use ‘evening’ as your answer; note that ‘in the evening’ would be incorrect
    pay attention to the word limit; for example, if you are asked to complete a sentence using no more than two words, if the correct answer is ‘silk shirt’, the answer ‘shirt made of silk’ would be incorrect
    attempt all questions; there are no penalties for incorrect answers, so you have nothing to lose
  • check your answers

 

IELTS Writing: Test Day Advice

IELTS Writing: Test Day Advice

Writing test advice

Follow this Writing test advice, and make sure you know how to manage your time.

Write your answers in pen or pencil. You may write entirely in capital letters if you wish.

You may make notes on the question paper, but nothing you write on the question paper will be marked.

Make the most of your IELTS Writing test:

  • analyse each task properly and spend some time making notes
  • highlight or underline key words in the tasks to make sure that you focus on what you have to do
  • plan your answers
  • use paragraphs clearly; put one idea in each paragraph
  • do not repeat ideas using different words
  • do not copy whole sentences from the question – you will receive no marks for this
  • keep to the topic; do not write about unrelated subjects
  • manage your time; remember, Task 2 is worth twice as much as Task 1
  • spend approximately 20 minutes on Task 1 and approximately 40 minutes on Task 2
  • pay attention to the number of words required for each task; you will lose marks if you do not write at least 150 words for Task 1 and at least 250 words for Task 2
  • learn to recognise how long 150 and 250 words look in your handwriting; you will not have time to count during the test
  • you must write your answers in full; answers written in note form or in bullet points will lose marks
  • pay attention to spelling, grammar and punctuation; you will lose marks for mistakes
IELTS Listening: Test Day Advice

IELTS Listening: Test Day Advice

Listening test advice

Follow this Listening test advice, and make sure you understand how to respond to ‘completion’ type questions.

You will be given time to read through the questions before you listen. You will hear each recording of the Listening test only once.

As you listen, write your answers on the question paper. At the end of the test, you will have 10 minutes to transfer your answers to the answer sheet in pencil. You may write your answers in lower case or capital letters.

It is essential that you transfer your answers to the answer sheet. Nothing you write on the question paper will be marked.

Make the most of your Listening test:

  • if you cannot hear the audio clearly, let a member of staff know straightaway
  • follow the instructions carefully; they may be different to practice or previous tests
  • listen for the specific information you want
  • try and anticipate what the speaker will say; this will require concentration
  • do not worry if there is a word you do not understand; you may not need to use it
  • if you do not know the answer to a question, attempt it but do not waste time; move quickly onto the next one
  • be careful with your spelling and grammar
  • do not panic if you think the topic is too difficult or the speaker is too fast; relax and tune in
  • read, write and listen at the same time
  • focus precisely on what you are asked to do in completion type questions
  • pay attention to the word limit; for example, if you are asked to complete a sentence using no more than two words, if the correct answer is ‘leather coat’, the answer ‘coat made of leather’ would be incorrect
  • if the question asks you to complete the note ‘in the…’ and the correct answer is ‘morning’, note that ‘in the morning’ would be incorrect; the correct answer is ‘morning’
  • attempt all questions; there are no penalties for incorrect answers
  • check your answers
IELTS test day advice

IELTS test day advice

Prepare for your test day; success starts with IELTS

You will find the IELTS test centre staff friendly, welcoming and highly professional. They will make sure that the test is delivered fairly and securely. Follow their instructions carefully.

The week before your test

Check the start time and location of your IELTS test the week before, and make sure you know how to get there on time.

Remember, the address of your IELTS test location may be different to that of the test centre where you booked your test.

Take the time to read full details of the ‘IELTS test terms and conditions’ for important information about your IELTS test day.

Your IELTS test day

You need to arrive in good time for your IELTS test. If you arrive late, you may not be allowed to take the test.

Switch off your mobile phone and any other electronic devices. You will be asked to place these with other personal belongings outside the test room.

The Listening, Reading and Writing tests take 2 hours 40 minutes and there are no breaks between each part of the test.

Make sure you are prepared and have something to eat and drink beforehand. You will not be allowed to take food into the test room; you will only be allowed to take a drink in a transparent bottle.

Your identity and photographs

The IELTS test location staff will check your identity when you arrive.

Make sure you have the right ID with you. If you arrive with the wrong ID, you will not be allowed to take the test.

You may also need two recent identical passport-sized photographs.

Test Day Photography

Some test locations will now also take a photograph of you on the test day – this photograph taken by the test centre will appear on your Test Report Form to provide increased identity security. Your test centre will let you know if it is going to do this. 

Check the details that you were given when you booked the test to make sure you take the right ID and photographs with you.

During the IELTS test

You will only be allowed to have a pen or pencil, an eraser and your ID on your desk.

If you need to go to the bathroom during the test, put your hand up to attract the attention of the invigilator. Do not disturb other candidates.

If you have any questions during the test, raise your hand to ask for help.

When you take the Listening test, check that you can hear the test properly. Raise your hand straightaway and let the invigilator know if you cannot hear the recording.

Please remember that you will have 10 minutes after the Listening section to fill in your answer sheet. You will not have 10 minutes after the Reading section, so please make sure that you write your answers on your Reading answer sheet as you complete each section.

At the end of the test

Stay in your seat until the invigilator gives you permission to leave the room.

If you think that there have been any issues that may have affected your performance, tell the invigilator straightaway.

If you want to make a complaint about your test day, you need to do this within one week of the test date.

Your invigilator will have a Test Day Incident Form. Please fill this in if you want to raise an issue or make a complaint.

Special arrangements

If you have asked for special arrangements as a result of a disability or other condition, adjustments will be made for you on the test day.

Test day tips

Understand the task

Follow instructions carefully during the test. Remember that the Writing parts of the test have specific word length requirements.

Allow enough time for each question

Some questions have suggested time limits for you to follow. Every test room will have a clock on the wall. Stay aware of the time during the test so that you can complete all the questions.

Stay calm enough to do your best

If you feel worried, take deep breaths to calm down. Focus on the questions and do not rush your answers. This will help you to do your best.

Frequently Asked Question about IELTS

Frequently Asked Question about IELTS

IELTS FAQ section:

The IELTS FAQ section tries to answer all the questions that candidates might be wondering to know. We really appreciate your visit to the IELTS FAQ section. Try to find the answers of your questions from the questions & answers listed below and email us at info@mrkielts.com for any further query or for the questions that are not listed here.

If you cannot find a question and the corresponding answer of it related to IELTS Exam from the below listed FAQs, email us to info@mrkielts.com We will add this question with a detailed answer in this section and that would be beneficial for others as it would save them for further frustration. We also recommend you to visit the official website of British council (http://www.britishcouncil.org ) & IELTS (http://www.ielts.org ) for more details and recent changes in the IELTS Exam.

What is IELTS?

IELTS stands for International English Language Testing System. IELTS exam is designed to assess the readiness of candidates to study or train in further or higher education courses held in English at college or university. IELTS provides a profile of a candidate’s English proficiency. The profile contains not only an indication of a candidate’s ability in a particular module but also an indication of overall ability.

IELTS is recognized by universities and employers in many countries, including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK and the USA. It is also recognized by professional bodies, immigration authorities and other government agencies.

For you, the IELTS score is a proof of your English proficiency in general. IELTS is recognised worldwide and that’s why if you have a good IELTS score, you can use this certificate as proof of your proficiency of handling English as a second language.

Who owns the IELTS test?

IELTS is owned and administered by the following organizations:
University of Cambridge ESOL Exams, The British Council, IDP Education Australia & IELTS Australia.

These organizations set the exam standard, maintain the IELTS exam, monitor the standard, review and change the exam format and everything related to the IELTS exam.

What is the purpose of the IELTS?

The purpose of the IELTS exam is to test the candidates’ ability of handling English language who want to study or work in a country where English is the language of communication. IELTS result is also necessary for the immigration purposes.

Each year millions of people take the IELTS exam to achieve a score that would prove their English language proficiency. IELTS is one of the most widely accepted international exams. IELTS exam is available for students and immigration applicants to demonstrate their English language proficiency for specific purposes.

Not necessarily you will get admission to a foreign country or get visa to live there because of your IELTS score. But the college/ University you are going to apply or the immigrant authority would ask for an accepted proof of your English skill and your IELTS score your serve the purpose.

What are the two types of IELTS?

IELTS test is available in two formats – Academic and General Training.

» Academic Module is suitable for those who are going to apply for further studies and professional registration. If you are planning to get admitted in undergraduate or post graduate course at a college or university where English is necessary, you should take the Academic IELTS test. In fact your university would ask your academic IELTS score and the General Training IELTS score might not be accepted for this purpose.

» General Training Module is appropriate for those who are going to English-speaking countries to complete work experience and training programs or for immigration purposes. General training IELTS tests the candidates communication skills which is needed for people who is not a English speaker and want to migrate to a country where English is the language of communication.

The university or the immigration authority who will be receiving your papers can tell you in prior which form of IELTS you are required to complete. So, if you have any confusion, contacting the corresponding authority would be the best thing to do.

Should I take IELTS Academic or GT Module exam?

The IELTS Academic Module exam is intended for those who want to study in an English-speaking country or where the medium of communication is English, as well as for medical professionals who want to practice abroad.

The IELTS General Module exam is for those who want to emigrate to Australia, Canada or New Zealand, undergo practical vocational training, or do a work placement. Before you register we strongly advise you to check directly with the institution you are doing the test for. It is your responsibility to choose the module that suits your purpose.

Consider the fact that, you need an academic IELTS score (as the name implies) to get admitted in an academic (be it a college or university). For general training or immigration purposes you would require the General Training IELTS score.

If you have an academic IELTS score that would be usually accepted for immigration or training purposes as well. But GT IELTS score might not be accepted by the college/ university authority where you are planning to complete your undergraduate or postgraduate studies.

It is advisable to contact to the appropriate authority who would be processing your papers (admission/ training or immigration) to be sure which version if IELTS you are required to sit.

What are the differences between Academic and GT version of IELTS?

The Academic Version of IELTS is designed and therefore intended for those who want to  get themselves admitted in universities or any other higher educational institutes for undergraduate and postgraduate courses and for professionals  who want to study or practice in an English-speaking country.

The General Training (GT) IELTS is intended for those who are willing to gain work experience, undertake non-academic training or for immigration purposes.

The listening and speaking sections are exactly same both for the academic and General training IELTS candidates. The reading and writing sections differ. For academic IELTS candidates the reading passages are longer and are generally related to academic reading. On the contrary the GT readings are designed to test the general instruction, basic reading ability. In writing part, the academic candidates need to write a report or summary from a given chart, graph or diagram whereas the General Training candidates need to write an application on real life issues.

What are the 4 sections of IELTS?

There are 4 sections or modules in IELTS: Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking.
All candidates take the same Listening and Speaking tests, but Reading and Writing tests vary depending on whether a candidate is taking the Academic IELTS test or the General Training IELTS test.

The Academic Reading test examines the candidates’ ability to read and extract specific information from the reading materials. The reading passages are generally of academic interests and are designed to test how well the candidates would be able to conduct their academic reading where skimming and finding information, understanding themes of reading are necessary.

The General Training Reading module tests candidates’ ability to find specific instructions or information from reading materials which are generally found in everyday life.

The Academic Writing tests candidates’ ability to write summary of a given illustration and the ability to write essay on several issues. The presentation, writing pattern, logic, coherence and relevancy etc. are tested in writing task two (essay writing).

The General Training Writing examines the test takers skill on writing letters, applications as well as essay writing ability.

Note that the writing task two i.e. essay writing is same both for the academic and GT test takers.

The Listening part test examinees’ ability to understand the language and then recall the information heard.

The Speaking part tests the candidates ability to introduce themselves, talk about known issues, giving details of their background, discussing in details about general, social and international issues of common interest, the vocabulary, fluency and overall speaking skill.

Which countries accept the IELTS Score?

IELTS is accepted as the standard international test system for English language proficiency by a whole range of institutions. These include the majority of all education establishments operating in English in Australia, Canada, the UK and New Zealand. US educational institutions are also now starting to use it. Many international immigration services also use the IELTS as well as various professional organizations including the British and Australian Medical Councils and the UK Ministry of Defence.

In most of the countries where university courses are offered in English or people speak English to communicate, IELTS score is accepted as a proof of your English proficiency. Many European countries where English in not the first or even second language would ask for IELTS to get admitted in a university or college that offers courses in English.

Simply consider the fact that, IELTS is a test that demonstrates a candidate’s English proficiency and this exam and its score is accepted worldwide wherever you need to show a proof of your English skill.

What is the computer-based IELTS test?

The computer-based version of IELTS is an alternative of paper-and-pencil based IELTS exam. This test is also called CB IELTS and this was introduced in May 2005. You can sit for any of the two types. However computer based IELTS is only available for academic modules at selected centers only. To find out if your nearby center offer the computer based IELTS or not, you will need to contact them.

The Reading and Listening modules in CB IELTS are conducted in a Computer and the writing module can be done in a computer or in a paper based on candidate’s preference. However, the speaking module would still be administered the way it had been, i.e. face-to-face interview session with an examiner.

What is the minimum age requirement for IELTS?

IELTS is recommended for candidates over the age of 16. In other word, to take the IELTS test a candidate must be 16 years old or over.

For how long the IELTS test result is valid?

Generally a Test Report Form (TRF) or IELTS result is valid for 2 years. However there are other factors to determine the validity period. But usually you should consider your IELTS score valid for 2 years and if your IELTS Report Form is older than 2 years, you should consider sitting for the exam again to get another TRF form to send to your University or immigration authority.

What can I do if I am not satisfied with my results?

You might apply for an inquiry on results (EoR) procedure within six weeks from the date you took the IELTS exam, using a prescribed form by the IELTS authority if you are dissatisfied with the result you got.  The application for re-examining the score needs you to fill the form which must be paid prior to the processing of the appeal. The fees may vary depending on the countries and IELTS centers. Then your result will be re-examined and if necessary will be corrected.

How long does the IELTS exam take?

The IELTS examination takes approximately 2 hours and 45 minutes to complete. The time schedules for the reading, writing and listening sections are fixed but for the speaking section that may vary.

Reading and Writing sections each one takes 1 hour. The listening test takes 30 minutes. The speaking part usually lasts for 15 minutes but there is no fixed time limit for the interview or speaking section. you can expect to finish the speaking module in 15-20 minutes.

For details of the IELTS exam structure please visit About IELTS

How much does it cost to take IELTS?

The cost of the IELTS exam is not fixed. It is set by test centers. Fees may vary depending on the countries and test centers. On an average the cost is approximately GBP 140. You can find the exact fees from the official IELTS website by locating your nearby test center from http://www.ielts.org/test_centre_search/search_results.aspx

Can IELTS be an alternative to TOEFL?

The answer is YES and NO. Both the IELTS and TOEFL are designed to evaluate the test takers English skill for academic and communication purposes. Though the exam formats of these two exams are similar, there are few differences as well. You can take either TOEFL or IELTS if the college or university you are going to apply accepts either one. If they have any strict requirement for TOEFL, your IELTS score won’t be accepted. But in practice, most of the colleges, universities and immigration authorities accept both of these exams.

It is commonly known that USA universities prefer TOEFL score whereas European and other universities accept both. But recently USA agreed to recognize IELTS and accept either IELTS or TOEFL for admission purposes and hence they will accept both the exams. However there are still some institutes and universities those want a TOEFL score and do not accept IELTS. For an updated list of the universities those accept IELTS, please visit www.ielts.org

To be on safe side, double check with your university or immigration authority before sitting for an exam.

Where are the IELTS test centers?

IELTS test centers can be found in almost all of the countries including yours. If you have seen a British Council, idp or ESOL Examination office somewhere in your locality, you can get details from there. Selct your country name and the city you live in, it will show all of the IELTS test centers around your locality. Currently there are more than 900 test centers present in 130 different countries.

For a comprehensive and most recent list of the IELTS test centers go to the page http://www.ielts.org/test_centre_search/search_results.aspx

What is the pass/ fail mark in IELTS?

In IELTS exam there is no pass or fail. IELTS results are prepared on a nine-band scale. In addition to the score for overall language ability, IELTS provides a score in the form of a profile for each of the four skills i.e. Listening, Reading, Writing and speaking. If you attend the IELTS exam and compete it, you will be given report of the result that would include individual band score of the four module as well as the Average band score. This band score would reflect your skill and ability of handling English language.

What should I bring to do the IELTS registration?

You will need the following to register yourself for the IELTS exam:

1. Registration fee. (you can pay in your local currency)
2. Valid Passport.
3. Two copy colour passport size photographs.
4. Country and Language code.

( Don’t worry if you do not know the Country and Language code. You can find it from the help desk of the test centre or browse the country codes from IELTS Registration Country Code )

The above mentioned materials and papers are usually required for the IELTS exam registration. However, the requirement might change and you should always contact the local IELTS authority before going there for registration. They can give you the details of requirement for IELTS registration. Check the list and make sure you have all the necessary papers and materials for the registration.

What happens if I’m unable to appear for the IELTS test?

Don’t take the IELTS exam like one of your class tests where you can contact your course teacher or administrative officer and sit for the exam at an alternative schedule. IELTS tests are pre-scheduled and you won’t get an alternative exam schedule if you miss your exam.

There are some unavoidable reasons that might hinder you to take part in the exams and If you fail to appear for the IELTS test, you will be treated as a ‘No Show‘ candidate by the IELTS exam authority. No refunds will be possible for a ‘no shows’ candidate. However, there are some special circumstances under which your application may be considered with some conditions. Acceptance of your form is subject to approval by the test center and if you can’t give a strong reason with supporting papers you won’t get any refund.

In which Countries IELTS exam is taken?

The IELTS test is taken every year across 130 countries and the number is rapidly growing. It is not far away when all of the countries of the world would have IELTS test centers. To find the complete list click in « IELTS CENTERS ». It is one of the fastest growing English language tests in the world, and sets the standard in integrity, research and innovation and that’s why candidates from all around the globe are taking this exam.

Can a native English speaker take the IELTS exam?

Yes, a candidate who speaks English as the primary language can sit for the IELTS exam. There is no restriction imposed on that.

If you are a native English speaker and studied your previous degrees from institutions where English was used as part of the academic practice, you can be exempted to supply the IETLS score to the intended university/ college or in immigration offices. Contact to the university or college you are going to get admitted or contact to the immigration office to be sure if you need this test to prove your English skill or not.

Is there any special consideration in IELTS exam for the disable candidates?

IELTS aims to assess the English language communication skills of all test takers fairly and objectively. The IELTS test centers can make arrangements to accommodate special circumstances or requirements to enable test takers to attend a test centre, and to understand questions and tasks and give their answers. Test centers require three months’ notice to put special arrangements in place. Generally some special circumstances are considered like: Visual difficulties, Hearing difficulties, Illness.

If you are genuinely ill on the day of the exam or during the test you should let the test supervisor know. Special consideration may be given to test takers who report their illness on the day of the test. Like all other standard exam centres there might be some limitations on the facilities offered.

When will I get my IELTS result?

The IELTS test center will produce the result after 13 calendar days of the test. At some centers candidates may collect their results on the 13th day from the test centers or it is mailed to candidates on the 13th day.

Most candidates now collect their IELTS result from the internet. However, test centers do not give results to the candidates over the phone or by fax or e-mail. In some countries the result is sent via SMS to the number the candidate has given while registering for the test.

You can check your IELTS result online from https://results.ielts.org

Can I make some notes on the Listening & Reading question paper?

Yes you can. The examiner will not see your question papers. You can take notes like a date, a place name or other important keywords that might help you answering your listening or reading exams questions. However, DO NOT write or mark on the answer sheet.

Be careful about what you write on the questions papers. After the exam you are not allowed to take the exam papers with you. You need to submit your questions papers along with your answer sheet.

Does the IELTS test differ in various parts of the world?

IELTS is a global standard test. It does not assess candidates from different geographical location differently. However the questions may vary depending on the test locations or centers. But the IELTS authority strictly maintains the standard and questions format in all location. You are likely to get a different question set for a different geographic location but the standard of the questions, test and evaluation would be same.

There are some misconceptions that certain test centers’ exams are easy compared to others, a native examiner would be hard to convince in speaking exam … etc. But don’t bother about these misconceptions and strictly focus on your exam preparation.

Can I take the IELTS exam more than once?

Yes, you can take the IELTS exam as many times as you want. Even if you have got a decent band score and the score has its validity, and you expect to get a higher score, you can sit for the IELTS exam once again at your convenient.

Few years back there was a restriction on sitting for the exam second time within a prescribed duration, but this is no longer applicable and you can sit for your IELTS exam as many times as you want. Each exam would require you to register for it and there is no waiver if you have taken the exam previously.

Will my previous IELTS score affect my new score?

No, your previous IELTS score will not affect your new IELTS score. You do not need to bother about your previous score if you are sitting for the IELTS a second time. Your score would be given as if you are sitting for the IELTS first time. In your Report Form (result), previous score won’t be mentioned.

What happens if a candidate is absent on the IELTS test date?

If a candidate is absent on the day of the IELTS test s/he will be treated as a ‘No Show‘ candidate. S/he will not get any result and if s/he was absent without giving prior notice, will normally lose the full test fee unless he/she is provides appropriate medical evidence to the center to explain the absence. Medical evidence must be provided within 5 days of the test.

What if I become ill during the IELTS test?

If you get seriously ill during the test, you should report it to the test supervisor immediately. Then the test center will take special care about the situation and might give special consideration. No consideration or favour is possible if it is not brought to the attention of the test supervisor.

Your test is important so report to the test supervisor as soon as you feel sick and you might get a favour.

How soon can I repeat the IELTS test?

From May 1, 2006 the policy on candidates re-taking IELTS has been amended. According to this new policy a candidate can re-take exam anytime s/he likes. The restriction on re-taking IELTS within 90 days has been removed and candidates are able to repeat the test whenever they wish.

Please note that, you will still be asked to indicate on your application form whether you have taken the IELTS test before or not. This information will not appear on the Test Report Form (TRF) and will only be used for monitoring purposes. So you can take the IELTS exam whenever you wish.

Can I leave the Exam room during my IELTS exam?

No, you are not permitted to leave the test room during the examination in normal circumstances. You should be prepared not to leave the exam room during the test. The time is very crucial in your test.

However, if there is an emergency or special circumstance when you have to go out, just explain it to your test supervisor. You won’t be given any extra time in IELTS exam.

Can I get a better score at an IELTS test center than at others?

Absolutely NOT! IELTS officials use many means to ensure standardization of Band Scores throughout the world. Of course, it could be true that taking IELTS in an English speaking country is beneficial, but only because you are being exposed to English every day not because taking test there would give you any privilege regarding the exam.

IELTS questions, tests and result standards are strictly maintained all over the world.

Focus on your preparation and improve your English skill, you will get a high band score from your nearby test centre.

Can I use a driving license/student ID card as a proof of my identity?

NO, driving licenses and student identity cards are not acceptable forms of identification for the IELTS registration and test. Candidates must have a valid passport or accepted identity card like Social Security Card, National ID card to register for the IELTS exam. The ID document specified on the application form has to be brought along on the test day.

Please note that, Non-EU nationals must carry their passport as a proof of their identity.

Using the Passport is the best form of presenting your identification.

What can I do if I wants to postpone or cancel my application?

If you request a postponement or cancellation of your IELTS test within 5 weeks of the test date, you’ll normally be charged the full fee. You should not expect any refund from the test center but notifying would save you from marked as a No Show Candidate.

If the reason is strong enough and you are able to provide appropriate papers, medical evidence to support your request within 5 days of the test date, the test authority might return you a partial refund.

 

MRK IELTS Android App

MRK IELTS Android App

All four IELTS skills are covered together in a single app – MRK IELTS.

The MRK IELTS – Free app provides sample content for you to try covering each of the individual skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Each IELTS Skill is available as a separate app:

► MRK IELTS – Reading
► MRK IELTS – Listening
► MRK IELTS – Speaking
► MRK IELTS – Writing

All four skills are also available together in a single app – MRK IELTS.

The MRK IELTS apps provide exam practice exercises and interactive tasks to help you develop the skills you will need to do well at IELTS.

► 100% free.
► Made by MD Raihan Khan the founder of MRK IELTS.
► A wide range of innovative and interactive exercises that help you work on the essential skills needed for the IELTS exam.
► Each skill is explained andcomes with examples and an interactive exercise.
► Practise answering a full range of question types that you can expect to find in the IELTS exam.
► A detailed overview of the exam.
► Score yourself on the interactive Can Do statement section.

Application Name: MRK IELTS

Application Size: 1.73mb

Download Link 1

Download Link 2

Troubleshooting

Step 1

If installation is blocked, go to your settings 
 
 

Step 2

Enable ‘Allow installation of apps from sources other than the Play Store’
 
 

Step 3

Then re-install the app again
 
Thank you for downloading.
IELTS ACADEMIC WRITING DESCRIPTION | MRK IELTS

IELTS ACADEMIC WRITING DESCRIPTION | MRK IELTS

There are two Writing tasks and BOTH must be completed

Timing: 60 minutes

No. of questions: 2

Task types:

In Task 1 test takers are asked to describe some visual information (graph/table/chart/diagram), and to present the description in their own words.

They need to write 150 words in about 20 minutes. In Task 2 test takers are presented with a point of view or argument or problem. They need to write 250 words in about 40 minutes.

Answering:

Answers must be given on the answer sheet and must be written in full. Notes or bullet points in whole or in part are not acceptable as answers. Test takers may write on the question paper but this cannot be taken from the examination room and will not be seen by the examiner.

IELTS Academic Writing in detail

A detailed look at the paper with links to related resources.

Task 1

Task type and format:

In Writing Task 1, test takers may be asked to describe facts or figures presented in one or more graphs, charts or tables on a related topic; or they may be given a diagram of a machine, a device or a process and asked to explain how it works. Test takers should make sure to include the most important and the most relevant points in the diagram. Some minor points or details may be left out.

They should write in an academic or semi-formal/neutral style.

Test takers should spend no more than 20 minutes on this task. They are asked to write at least 150 words and will be penalised if their answer is too short. While test takers will not be penalised for writing more than 150 words, they should remember that a longer Task 1 answer may mean that they have less time to spend on Task 2, which contributes twice as much to the Writing band score.Test takers should also note that they will be penalised for irrelevance if the response is off-topic or is not written as full, connected text (e.g. using bullet points in any part of the response, or note form, etc.). They will be severely penalised if their writing is plagiarised (i.e. copied from another source).

Test takers must write their answers on the answer booklet.

Task focus

This task assesses the test takers’s ability to identify the most important and relevant information and trends in a graph, chart, table or diagram, and to give a well-organised overview of it using language accurately in an academic register or style.

No. of questions: 01

Task 2

Task type and format:

In Writing Task 2, test takers are given a topic to write about. Answers should be a discursive consideration of the relevant issues. Test takers should make sure that they read the task carefully and provide a full and relevant response. For example, if the topic is a particular aspect of computers, they should focus on this aspect in their response. They should not simply write about computers in general.

They should write in an academic or semi-formal/neutral style.

Test takers should spend no more than 40 minutes on this task. They are asked to write at least 250 words and will be penalised if their answer is too short. While test takers will not be penalised for writing more than 250 words, if they write a very long answer they may not have time for checking and correcting at the end and some ideas may not be directly relevant to the question. They may also produce handwriting which is unclear.

Task 2 contributes twice as much to the final Writing band score as Task 1. Therefore, test takers who fail to attempt to answer this task will greatly reduce their chance of achieving a good band.

Test takers should also note that they will be penalised for irrelevance if the response is off-topic or is not written as full, connected text (e.g. using bullet points in any part of the response, or note form, etc.). They will be severely penalised if their writing is plagiarised (i.e. copied from another source). Finally, test takers should make sure that they do not copy directly from the question paper because this will not be assessed.
Test takers must write their answers on the answer booklet.

Task focus

This task assesses the test takers’s ability to present a clear, relevant, well-organised argument, giving evidence or examples to support their ideas, and to use language accurately.

No. of questions: 01

IELTS Academic Writing – How it’s marked

Marking and assessment

Each task is assessed independently. The assessment of Task 2 carries more weight in marking than Task 1.
Writing responses are assessed by certificated IELTS examiners. All IELTS examiners hold relevant teaching qualifications and are recruited as examiners by the test centres and approved by British Council or IDP: IELTS Australia.

Scores are reported in whole and half bands. Detailed performance descriptors have been developed which describe written performance at the nine IELTS bands. Public versions of these descriptors are available on the How IELTS is scored page. The descriptors apply to both the Academic and General Training Modules and are based on the following criteria.

Task 1 responses are assessed on:

►Task Achievement
►Coherence and Cohesion
►Lexical Resource
►Grammatical Range and Accuracy.

Task 2 responses are assessed on:

►Task Response
►Coherence and Cohesion
►Lexical Resource
►Grammatical Range and Accuracy.

Task achievement

This criterion assesses how appropriately, accurately and relevantly the response fulfils the requirements set out in the task, using the minimum of 150 words. Academic Writing Task 1 is a writing task which has a defined input and a largely predictable output. It is basically an information-transfer task which relates narrowly to the factual content of an input diagram and not to speculated explanations that lie outside the given data.

Coherence and cohesion

This criterion is concerned with the overall clarity and fluency of the message: how the response organises and links information, ideas and language. Coherence refers to the linking of ideas through logical sequencing. Cohesion refers to the varied and appropriate use of cohesive devices (for example, logical connectors, pronouns and conjunctions) to assist in making the conceptual and referential relationships between and within sentences clear.

Lexical resource

This criterion refers to the range of vocabulary the test takers have used and the accuracy and appropriacy of that use in terms of the specific task.
Grammatical range and accuracy

This criterion refers to the range and accurate use of the test takers’ grammatical resource as manifested in their test takers’s writing at the sentence level.

Task 2

Task response

In both Academic and General Training Modules Task 2 requires the test takers to formulate and develop a position in relation to a given prompt in the form of a question or statement. Ideas should be supported by evidence, and examples may be drawn from the test takers’ own experience. Responses must be at least 250 words in length. Scripts under the required minimum word limit will be penalised.

Coherence and cohesion

This criterion is concerned with the overall clarity and fluency of the message: how the response organises and links information, ideas and language. Coherence refers to the linking of ideas through logical sequencing.Cohesion refers to the varied and appropriate use of cohesive devices (for example, logical connectors, pronouns and conjunctions) to assist in making the conceptual and referential relationships between and within sentences clear.

Lexical resource

This criterion refers to the range of vocabulary the test takers have used and the accuracy and appropriacy of that use in terms of the specific task.

Grammatical range and accuracy

This criterion refers to the range and accurate use of the test takers’ grammatical resource as manifested in their test takers’s writing at the sentence level.

 

IELTS LISTENING DESCRIPTION | MRK IELTS

IELTS LISTENING DESCRIPTION | MRK IELTS

Paper format:

In IELTS Listening there are four sections, each with ten questions. The questions are designed so that the answers appear in order in the listening. The first two sections deal with situations set in everyday social contexts. There is a conversation between two speakers in Section 1 (for example, a conversation about travel arrangements) and a monologue in Section 2 (for example, a speech about local facilities). The final two sections deal with situations set in educational and training contexts. In Section 3 there is a conversation between two main speakers (for example, two university students in discussion, perhaps guided by a tutor), and Section 4 is a monologue on an academic subject. The recordings are heard once only. They include a range of accents, including British, Australian, New Zealand and American.

Timing: Approximately 30 minutes (plus 10 minutes’ transfer time).

No. of questions: 40

Task types: A variety of questions is used, chosen from the following types: multiple choice, matching, plan/map/diagram labelling, form/note/table/flow-chart/summary completion, sentence completion.

Answering: During the Listening test test takers write their answers on the question paper as they listen and at the end of the test are given 10 minutes to transfer their answers to an answer sheet. Care should be taken when writing answers on the answer sheet as poor spelling and grammar are penalised.
Marks: All questions carry 1 mark.

IELTS Listening in detail

Task type 1 – Multiple choice

Task type and format:

In this task type, there is a question followed by three possible answers, or the beginning of a sentence followed by three possible sentence endings. Test takers are required to choose the one correct answer A, B or C.

Sometimes test takers are given a longer list of possible answers and told that they have to choose more than one. In this case they should read the question carefully to check how many answers are required.

Task focus

This task type is used to test a wide range of skills. It may require the test taker to have a detailed understanding of specific points or an overall understanding of the main points of the listening text.

No. of questions: Variable 

Task type 2 – Matching

Task type and format:

In this task type, test takers are required to match a numbered list of items from the listening text to a set of options on the question paper. The set of options may be criteria of some kind.
Many variations of this task type are possible with regards the type of options to be matched.

Task focus

This task type assesses the skill of listening for detail. It assesses whether a test taker can understand information given in a conversation on an everyday topic such as different types of hotel or guest house accommodation. It also assesses the ability to follow a conversation involving interaction between two people. It may also be used to assess test takers’ ability to recognise relationships and connections between facts in the listening text.

No. of questions: Variable

Task type 3 – Plan, map, diagram labelling

Task type and format

In this task type, test takers are required to complete labels on a visual. The answers are usually selected from a list on the question paper. The visual may be: a diagram (e.g. a piece of equipment), a set of pictures, a plan (e.g. of a building), a map (e.g. of part of a town).

Task focus

This task type assesses the ability to understand, for example, a description of a place, and to relate this to a visual representation. This may include being able to follow language expressing spatial relationships and directions (e.g. straight on/through the far door).

No. of questions: Variable

Task type 4 – Form, note, table, flow-chart, summary completion

Task type and format

In this task type, test takers are required to fill in gaps in an outline of part or of all of the listening text. The outline will focus on the main ideas/facts in the text. It may be:

1) a form: often used to record factual details such as names;

2) a set of notes: used to summarise any type of information using the layout to show how different items relate to one another,

3) a table: used as a way of summarising information which relates to clear categories – e.g. place/time/price,

4) a flow-chart: used to summarise a process which has clear stages, with the direction of the process shown by arrows. Test takers may have to:

a) select their answers from a list on the question paper;

b) identify the missing words from the recording which fit into the form/notes, etc.

In this case, they should keep to the word limit stated in the instructions. Test takers do not have to change the words from the recording in any way. Test takers should read the instructions very carefully as the number of words or numbers they should use to fill the gaps will vary. A word limit is given, for example, ‘NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER’. Test takers are penalised for writing more than the stated number of words, and test takers should check this word limit carefully for each task. Contracted words will not be tested. Hyphenated words count as single words.

Task focus

This task type focuses on the main points which a listener would naturally record in this type of situation.

No. of questions: Variable

Task type 5 – Sentence completion

Task type and format

In this task type, test takers are required to read a set of sentences summarising key information from all the listening text or from one part of it. They have to complete a gap in each sentence using information from the listening text. A word limit is given, for example, ‘NO MORE THAN ONE WORD AND/OR A NUMBER’. Test takers are penalised for writing more than the stated number of words. (Test takers should check this word limit carefully for each task: the limit is either ONE, TWO or THREE words). Contracted words will not be tested. Hyphenated words count as single words.

Task focus

This task type focuses on the ability to identify the key information in a listening text. Test takers have to understand functional relationships such as cause and effect.

No. of questions: Variable

Task type 6 – Short-answer questions

Task type and format

In this task type, test takers are required to read a question to which they have to write a short answer using information from the listening text. A word limit is given, for example, ‘NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER’. Test takers are penalised for writing more than the stated number of words. (Test takers should check this word limit carefully for each task.) Contracted words will not be tested. Hyphenated words count as single words. Sometimes test takers are given a question which asks them to list two or three points.

Task focus

This task type focuses on the ability to listen for concrete facts – such as places, prices or times – given in the listening text.

No. of questions: Variable

IELTS Listening – how it’s marked

The Listening test is marked by certificated markers, who are regularly monitored to ensure reliability. After marking at the test centre, all answer sheets are returned to Cambridge English Language Assessment for analysis.

Band score conversion

A Band Score conversion table is produced for each version of the Listening test which translates scores out of 40 into the IELTS 9-band scale. Scores are reported in whole bands and half bands.

One mark is awarded for each correct answer in the 40-item test. A confidential Band Score conversion table is produced for each version of the Listening test, which translates scores out of 40 into the IELTS 9-band scale. Scores are reported in whole and half bands. Care should be taken when writing answers on the answer sheet as poor spelling and grammar are penalised.